The RWJF Health & Society Scholars program ended February 2017. The site will no longer be updated. More »

Theresa Osypuk, S.D., S.M.


RWJF Health & Society Scholar:
2005-2007

Discipline(s):
Social Epidemiology, Epidemiology, Public Health

Area(s) of Expertise:
Racial Health Disparities, Racial Residential Segregation & Health, Place, Neighborhoods and Health, Socioeconomic Disparities

E-Mail:
tosypuk@umn.edu

Personal Webpage:
http://sph.umn.edu/faculty1/ech/name/theresa-osypuk/
https://experts.umn.edu/en/persons/theresa-l-osypuk



Background:

Dr. Osypuk received her Masters (2002) and Doctoral (2005) degrees from the Harvard School of Public Health, and received postdoctoral training in Population Health in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars fellowship in the University of Michigan Department of Epidemiology (2005-2007). She was on faculty as an Assistant Professor in Northeastern University’s MPH program in Urban Health in Boston (2007-2012) before joining the faculty at University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Before graduate school, Dr. Osypuk originally entered the public health field via communications, by creating national public service campaigns to change attitudes and behavior related to public health and social issues at The Advertising Council.  Dr. Theresa L. Osypuk, SD SM, is a social epidemiologist. Her research examines why place influences health and health disparities, including the roles of racial residential segregation, neighborhood context, and social policies. Her research explores how seemingly “non-health related” social policies (including those directly concerned with housing or neighborhoods) may reduce racial/ethnic health disparities. She researches racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and nativity/immigrant disparities in health, their geographic patterns, and causes.  Dr. Osypuk is currently the principal investigator of two National Institutes of Health grants investigating how housing choice vouchers and neighborhood context influence the mental health of adolescents and their families, in the Moving to Opportunity housing policy experiment. She is also a co-investigator on several NIH grants including a birth cohort to examine racism and preterm birth among black women, and a cohort study in Bangladesh to understand community norms related to intimate partner violence and women’s empowerment.


Journal Articles:
Click here for a list of Theresa Osypuk's available publications in PubMed.